Africa Pari-mutuel: Greyhound and Horse Racing

Thursday Apr 17th, 2014


Mauritius

The Champ de Mars track follows a very selective right hand oval path and with its 1298m circumference and 12 to 14 metres wide, it is relatively small in size. Races are run on usual distances from 1365m to 2400m, including distances to mark historic events or key figures like the 1365m, situated in front of the mast where is raised the flag in commemoration of the Independence Day, and the Draper's Mile (1500m), named after the founder of the club

Somehow, in its cultural heritage, the Mauritian population is characterised by widespread gambling habits. Over the years, betting at the races became more and more important. Traditionally, betting was organised through the Bookmakers who offer win bets only. They had total freedom in the calculation and determination of the odds. Since 1991, the Tote System operates in parallel with the Bookies. Betting facilities at the racecourse are now well diversified to meet the public demand and with the numerous betting counters, all forms of betting have been made readily accessible. Telephone betting was introduced on the Tote in 1994 and through Bookmaker companies in 2002.

Horse racing in South Africa

Horse racing is a hugely popular sport in South Africa, with regular racing taking place around the country. The sport in South Africa enjoys a long and rich history that can be traced back to 1797! The first recorded race club meeting took place five years later in 1802.

Racing in South Africa is controlled by two bodies: Phumelela Gaming and Leisure Limited, and Gold Circle. Phumelela controls racing in the Free State, Northern Cape, Eastern Cape and Gauteng, while Gold Circle has the reins in the Western Cape and Kwazulu-Natal.

Saftote controls the big-money betting industry. It is the banner under which Phumelela and Gold Circle work their totalizator. The betting system is controlled by the Maryland, USA-based company that designed it. All tote equipment has been given the South African Bureau of Standards stamp of approval.

In addition to Zimbabwe's casinos and lottery and Zimbet (which is very like a pools system), there are also two horse racing tracks in the country: the Matabeleland Turf Club in Bulawayo (the second city) and the Borrowdale Park in Harare.